News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/16/2018

New research into fatal encounters between residents in long-term care facilities suggests strategies that could curb future fatalities, says Eilon Caspi of the University of Minnesota. "It is critically important to break the cycle of the dangerous normalization of resident-to-resident incidents in long-term care homes," says Caspi.

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Medical Research
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University of Minnesota
8/16/2018

Researchers used data from the ACCORD trial to create a predictive model to estimate the five-year risk for severe hypoglycemia among individuals with type 2 diabetes and found that antihypertensive medication use, insulin use and intensive glycemic management were the top three predictors for severe hypoglycemia. The findings in the BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care revealed a total of 17 predictors of severe hypoglycemia, including glycemic management, years since diabetes diagnosis, age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference and history of hypoglycemia in the last week.

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diabetes
8/16/2018

Some diabetes patients have begun to cut back on their insulin use and ration dosages due to increasing prices for insulin. Dr. William Cefalu of the American Diabetes Association says this can lead to serious health problems, including kidney and nerve disease, blindness and amputations.

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NBC News
8/16/2018

Individuals who gained weight by up to 11 pounds were at an almost 15% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first six years after quitting smoking, with the risk declining after five to seven years, compared with those who continued smoking, according to a study in The New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers evaluated data on 333,530 individuals and also found that quitting smoking led to a significantly reduced risk of dying from stroke, heart attack and other cardiovascular disease and from any cause, which they said outweighs the risk of diabetes.

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Reuters
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diabetes, heart attack
8/16/2018

Canadian researchers analyzed data from 3,000 adults with and without type 2 diabetes, ages 30 and older, and found that those who had gum disease and low levels of vitamin D3 were at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The findings were published in the BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care.

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Diabetes (UK)
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gum disease
8/16/2018

Individuals with overweight or obesity who maintained a 5% to 10% weight loss for one year experienced a 22% reduced risk for metabolic syndrome, while a 15% to 19% weight loss was linked to a 37% lower risk, and a 20% or more weight loss was linked to a 53% lower risk, compared with those who maintained a less than 5% weight loss, according to a study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers used a cohort of 7,670 people and noted that losing more weight could produce "some really significant numbers related to metabolic health," said lead author Gregory Knell.

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metabolic syndrome
8/16/2018

Some small, rural hospitals are struggling to survive on their own and are looking for partnerships with larger groups to improve leverage with insurers and economies of scale. Sixty percent of the more than 5,500 hospitals in the US are already part of a health system, according to the American Hospital Association, and one expert said that percentage is expected to grow as more smaller hospitals join larger health systems.

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HealthLeaders Media
8/16/2018

Almost half of nurses ages 36 and younger say they plan to pursue a degree to become an advanced practice nurse, according to an AMN Healthcare survey of 3,400 nurses. Still, the "most pressing need in health care" remains the registered nurse, AMN Chief Clinical Officer Marcia Faller said.

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AMN Healthcare, Marcia Faller
8/16/2018

Relatives of patients with myeloid-type hematologic disorders had about double the risk of developing a myeloid disease as the general population, and the risk of myelodysplastic syndrome was seven times as high for first-degree relatives of people with that disease, according to a study in the journal Blood based on data for more than 35,000 patients and 93,000 relatives in Sweden. "Our study provides the strongest evidence yet for inherited risk for these diseases -- evidence that has proved evasive before in part because these cancers are relatively uncommon, and our ability to characterize these diseases has, until recently, been limited," said lead author Amit Sud.

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Rare Disease Report
8/16/2018

A CDC report showed 21 states and Washington, D.C., had 107 confirmed cases of measles from Jan. 1 through July 14 and most of the patients had not received vaccination. In all of last year, 118 cases were reported.

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CNN
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CDC, measles, District of Columbia