Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/22/2018

The WannaCrypt ransomware claims to have access to all computers on a network, demands payment in advance for not encrypting those computers and claims that once data is wiped, it will not be recoverable. Although it appears the campaign is a fraud and there is no malware that can do these things, data should be backed up regularly and all software patched and protected, writes computer security expert Paul Ducklin.

Full Story:
Naked Security blog
More Summaries:
Paul Ducklin
6/22/2018

A bill passed by the House would allow the disclosure of substance use disorder patients' records, without their written consent, to public health authorities and covered entities for payment, treatment and health care operations purposes, provided that the disclosure conforms to HIPAA standards. The bill also would forbid discrimination based on substance use disorder information disclosures and would prohibit the use of such patient records in certain federal, state and local criminal and civil actions.

Full Story:
Health IT Security
6/22/2018

DrChrono's EHR platform now includes Square's credit card processing services, allowing medical practices to accept and store debit and credit card information within the EHR and OnPatient patient portal.

More Summaries:
Drchrono, Square
6/21/2018

Almost 270,000 health and insurance records of patients may have been stolen when hackers accessed a computer workstation at health billing claims company Med Associates. The incident compromised patients' names, diagnosis and procedure codes, dates of service, insurance information, addresses and dates of birth.

6/21/2018

EY, formerly Ernst & Young, conducted a nationwide poll and found that better patient experience, customer relationships and clinical outcomes were the key motivations cited by respondents when implementing technology adoption initiatives within health care organizations. When asked about their main initiatives for the next 12 months, health care executives listed using analytics to assist with performance improvements, acquiring patient experience metrics and enacting digital health initiatives.

Full Story:
Healthcare IT News
More Summaries:
Ernst, Young
6/21/2018

The Department of Veterans Affairs' EHR project and "other major technology projects" will be monitored by an oversight panel to be created by the House, lawmakers announced. "It is important Congress is well-suited to hold VA accountable every step of the way and to ensure EHR modernization is implemented as seamlessly as possible," said Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn.

6/21/2018

Health information exchanges can help providers develop effective public health crisis responses, address patient matching issues, boost outreach to rural areas to enhance patient care and help achieve interoperability as the industry shifts toward value-based care, writes Elizabeth Snell. However, increasing cybersecurity threats and evolving regulations should prompt providers to meet data security needs to reassure patient data protection and be updated on laws that may affect information use and disclosure during data exchanges, Snell writes.

Full Story:
EHR Intelligence
More Summaries:
Elizabeth Snell
6/21/2018

The 2018 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey showed that 46% of almost 4,000 CIOs and technology leaders in 84 countries said their organizations have a shortfall of employees skilled in big data and analytics. Researchers also found that 36% cited a shortage of employees with technical architecture expertise, and 35% reported an organizational skill shortage in both security and resilience and enterprise architecture.

6/21/2018

Health care organizations should use open application programming interfaces to address and improve interoperability, National Coordinator for Health IT Don Rucker wrote in a blog post. "Our primary focus is to accelerate individuals' ability to access and send their health information via their smartphones or other electronic devices, so they can shop for and coordinate care," Rucker wrote.

Full Story:
HITInfrastructure
More Summaries:
Don Rucker, ONC
6/20/2018

Sixty-two percent of individuals ages 18 to 34 said they would let insurance companies use their digital data from sources such as fitness apps, smart-home devices and Facebook if doing so would lower their premiums, compared with 45% of those ages 35 to 54 and 27% of people ages 55 and older, according to a MuleSoft survey. Researchers polled over 8,000 consumers around the world and also found that 56% of respondents indicated they would change to a different insurance provider if they experienced poor digital service.